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Ream's Station   

Location: Dinwiddie County

Campaign: Richmond-Petersburg Campaign (June 1864-March 1865)

Date(s): June 29, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. James Wilson and Brig. Gen. August Kautz [US]; Maj. Gen. William Mahone and Maj. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee [CS]

Forces Engaged: Divisions

Estimated Casualties: 600 total  (1,817 for entire raid)

Description: Early morning June 29, Brig. Gen. August Kautz's division reached Ream's Station on the Weldon Railroad, which was thought to be held by Union infantry.  Instead, Kautz found the road barred by Mahone's Confederate infantry division. Wilson's division, fighting against elements of William H.F.  "Rooney" Lee's cavalry,  joined Kautz's near Ream's Station, where they were virtually surrounded. About noon, Mahone's infantry assaulted their front while Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry division threatened the Union left flank. The raiders burned their wagons and abandoned their artillery. Separated by the Confederate attacks, Wilson and his men cut their way through and fled south on the Stage Road to cross Nottoway River, while Kautz went cross-country, reaching Federal lines at Petersburg about dark. Wilson continued east to the Blackwater River before turning north, eventually reaching Union lines at Light House Point on July 2. The Wilson-Kautz raid tore up more than 60 miles of track, temporarily disrupting rail traffic into Petersburg, but at a great cost in men and mounts.

Result(s): Confederate victory

Monocacy

   Battle that Saved Washington

Location: Frederick County

Campaign: Early's Raid and Operations against the B&O Railroad (June-August 1864)

Date(s): July 9, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace [US]; Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early [CS]

Forces Engaged: Corps

Estimated Casualties: 2,359 total

Description: After marching north through the Shenandoah Valley from Lynchburg, the Confederate army of Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early side-stepped the Federal garrison at Harpers Ferry and crossed the Potomac River at Shepherdstown into Maryland on July 5-6. On July 9, 1864, a makeshift Union force under Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace attempted to arrest Early's invading Confederate divisions along the Monocacy River, just east of Frederick. Wallace, joined by Ricketts's Division of the VI Corps that had been rushed from the Petersburg lines, was outflanked by Gordon's Division and defeated after putting up a stiff resistance. Hearing of Early's incursion into Maryland, Grant embarked the rest of the VI Corps on transports at City Point, sending it with all dispatch to Washington. Wallace's defeat at Monocacy bought time for these veteran troops to arrive to bolster the defenses of Washington. Early's advance reached the outskirts of Washington on the afternoon of July 11, and the remaining divisions of the VI Corps began disembarking that evening. Monocacy was called the "Battle that Saved Washington."

Result(s): Confederate victory


Cool Spring

   Island Ford
Parkers Ford
Snickers Ferry
Castleman's Ferry

Location: Clarke County

Campaign: Early's Raid and Operations against the B&O Railroad (June-August 1864)

Date(s): July 17-18, 1864

Principal Commanders: Maj. Gen. Horatio Wright [US]; Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early [CS]

Forces Engaged: 13,000 total (US 5,000; CS 8,000)

Estimated Casualties: 819 total (US 422; CS 397)

Description: A Union column, consisting of the VI Corps and elements of the XIX Corps under Maj. Gen. Horatio Wright, pursued Early's army as it withdrew from the environs of Washington, D.C.  Wright's force was joined by elements of Crook's command, which had accompanied Hunter during his retreat through West Virginia.  On July 17, the Union cavalry passed through Snickers Gap and attempted to force passage of the Shenandoah River at Snickers Ford (Castleman's Ferry). On the morning of July 18, the vanguard of the Union infantry moved through Snickers Gap. Col. Joseph Thoburn (of Crook's command) led his division downstream to cross the river at Judge Richard Parker's Ford. Early's three nearby infantry divisions moved to defend the fords. In the afternoon, Rodes's division attacked and shattered Thoburn's right flank on the Cool Spring plantation. Thoburn made a stand behind a stone wall at the river's edge and beat off three attacks until darkness enabled him to withdraw. Union pursuit of Early was delayed several days.

Result(s): Confederate victory