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Photo of West Carlisle
Coutesey of Don and Ruby Gault

“About West Carlisle and Some People of That Vicinity”
By William E. Hunt, 1764-1876
Printed in: The Democrat and Standard, Coshocton, March 1, 1904

“I remember very distinctly the first mention I ever heard of West Carlisle. It was in 1853, three years before I ever saw Coshocton. I was in Cleveland, and was invited along with an old friend to spend an evening at the home of a Presbyterian minister of the city, who was just then quite in the eyes of the citizens. He had come to the City a little time before to establish an old school Presbyterian Church. He had out of his own private funds bought a house of worship, one built by the Millerites or Speedy Adventists, a round structure with one round window in the center through which it was planned to make the ascent to Heaven with the Christ at His coming at the end of the world. On two occasions the people had assembled with their ascension robes. After the second disappointment, they lost faith, the congregation dwindled and the property was in the market for sale and, having been bought and remodeled, served for a number of years for a good Presbyterian Congregation, gathered by the Minister, whose home I was in, at the time I have mentioned.

That Minister was Rev. Frederick T. Brown, and he told me his boyhood home had been in a little village of Coshocton County, called West Carlisle, a number of early settlers of the place having coming from Carlisle, Pa. Brown had a brother who for many years preached at Valparaiso, Indiana.

They were both men of more than average ability and success. The father was for many years the chief store keeper at West Carlisle. Besides the Browns, another Minister who was for many years quite prominent in the Congregational Church, had his boyhood home in West Carlisle, Rev. Mr. Billman. Not long after coming to Coshocton, I visited West Carlisle in connection with a meeting of Presbytery. On two occasions I long years ago visited the place to solemnize the marriage of the late Thomas LeRetilley of Roscoe and Barbara Ault, and also a daughter of Thomas McKee and Mr. Smith, son of County Commissioner Smith of that vicinity - a brother of our Dr. T. J. Smith, who for many years afterwards was a well established merchant in Utica.

I soon learned that the town and the region round about was one of the best in the County, and the history of it shows a goodly number of solid and worthy people. I readily recall on the moment the Henderson, the Preston, the Cochran, the Gault, the White, the Graham, the Chaney, and other families. As a rule the family connections were large and the character and influence upon the region was of the best sort. William Henderson, long since dead, and whom I never saw but once, must by all accounts have been a man of marvelous energy and shrewdness.

Thomas McKee, whose last years were spent in Columbus, was County Commissioner, while his brother George, was in the Legislature. I saw much of them and esteemed them greatly.

Robert Cochran, for some years before his death identified with Trinway, and his wife whose death occurred at that place only a few weeks ago, were people of note and most highly esteemed. A son, Will Cochran, was for several years a resident of Coshocton, engaged in the practice of law, having an office in the Democrat Building, and so a near neighbor of mine. Subsequently he was in business operations in Pittsburgh. He was a pleasant, brilliant fellow with more energy and ambition than bodily strength and died at Newark in the fullness of his young manhood of consumption leaving a widow, whose maiden name was Sturgeon from about Spring Mountain, and a son who practiced Dentistry in Coshocton for a brief period, now living at Trinway.

Bernard Preston, (he was called Old when I came to the COunty, perhaps there was then a young Bernard), with a vigor most noticeable still abides in that vicinity, losing nothing of the respect of his old neighbors in his multiplied years. A son and several grandsons are now well known residents of Coshocton.

The Whites, of old Virginia pioneer stock, have made their mark in industrial and public house and political lines. One of the older generation, complimented me not long since by declaring he had read more about me than about Napoleon Bonaparte. One of the family has been for several years well established in the jewelry and optical business in Columbus.

The Gaults of whom is our fellow citizen, Ex-Judge, William R. Gault, have, as many other large family connections, been please to avail themselves largely of my services as a solemnizer of marriage. Their careful industry and thrift have made them well-known in the vicinity and abroad.

The town of West Carlisle was platted* and started in 1821 by William Brown and William Anderson. Its natural and healthy growth of late years has been somewhat affected by the establishing of the new railroad town of Cooperdale, some three miles away. The old town may be a little somnolent in these days and not see many “hot times,” but it retains its old time dignity and points with pride to the record of its former and present citizens.

I think that after the town of Coshocton and perhaps one other locality, the township of Pike and part of Perry and part of Washington, central about West Carlisle, have furnished me with more cases in the wedding line than any other district of the County. And they are not all in yet. Only last week I had one.

Some of these days West Carlisle, always a healthy and homelike town, will, by the trolley line from Zanesville to Mount Vernon, be put in better shape and excel the glory of its earlier days. “So mote it be.”

*There are other accounts of the platting of West Carlisle - this is but one.

Other items of interest taken from the above series:

Drugs were in crude form, instruments were scarce. I once saw after I came to Coshocton, an enema administered to a small child with a great 10 inch long pewter syringe, and I have been told that when an arm was amputated in 1847, a saw brought from one of the butcher shops was used.

In very early days there was a scourge cold plague- some say congestive fever - affecting chiefly the rich valley regions. In the 50’s (1850) Keene had a visitation of the cholera. At the close of the War (Civil) Coshocton had a number of cases of unmistakable smallpox. Of late years, there have been several epidemics of typhoid fever and scarlet fever.

In recent years Dr. Edwards born and reared in the County with excellent reputation has been added to the list (local doctors). Dr. Neldon and Dr. Merriam are the latest additions to the medical corps of the city (Coshocton). Dr. Wilcox was the first homeopathic doctor. His wife also held a diploma and practiced with and independently of him. Mrs. Nanie Richards, M. D., of New Philadelphia was born and reared in Coshocton. So also was Dr. Alice Snyder now of Ann Arbor Michigan. It is quite plain that hitherto at least, Coshocton people have been in no mood to “throw” physic to the “dogs.” For better or worse they have walked after old Asa of the scriptures, of whom it is said; “Yet Asa in his disease sought not the Lord, but the physicians,” even though the record adds, “and Asa slept with his Fathers.”



Photocopy of 1872 Platt Map - West Carlsile


Photocopy of 1872 Platt Map - Pike Township


Platt Map
1850-1875
From Census Records,Platt Maps,
& Lewis Preston's Personal Account

Lot 31Lot 32 Lot 33AlleyLot 34 Lot 35 Lot 36
Peter
Mikesell
Carpen-
ter
N
O
Lot 37 Lot 38 Lot 39 Alley Lot 90 Lot 91 Lot 92
alley
Lot 12
Lewis
Bonnett
Lot 11
John
Kees
Wagon
Shop
*David
Roney
tailor
Lot 10
David
Welling
Paint
Shop
*Jacob
Toothman
butcher
*Levi
Ross
AlleyLot 9
R. H.
Cochran
*Henry
Sidle
cooper
*Widow
Pennington
Lot 8
R. H.
Cochran
*Willism
Henderson
Pioneer
Blacksmith
Lot 7
R. H.
Cochran
*Hawley
hatters
R
T
H
Lot 6
William
Welling
Blacksmith
Lot 5
Thomas
Thompson
Dry
Goods
Merchant
Lot 4
T. W.
Thompson
& Co.
Store
Post
Office
AlleyLot 3
Dr.
Edwards
Lot 2
Margaret
McDonnell
Seam-
stress
Lot 1
Mont-
gomery
Baird
Wagon
Maker
MAIN
STREET
Lot 13 Lot 14
J. W.
Magruder
Shoe-
maker
Broom
Maker
Lot 15
Black-
smith
Shop
AlleyLot 16
John
Simmons
Black-
smith
Lot 17 Lot 18
John
Thompson
Merchant
S
T
Lot 19
R.H.
Cochran
and a
Black-
smith
Shop
Lot 20
Ann
Cunningham
Store
Notions
Dry
Goods
Queens-
ware
Lot 21
American
House
Hotel
Sarah &
Lewis
White
Alley Lot 22
E. T.
Lovett
Cabinet
Maker
Lot 23
Carriage
Shop
Black-
smith
Lot 24
Edith
Yunker
Farmer
Alley
Lot 41
S.
Binger
farmed
Lot 40
S.
Binger
farmed
Lot 37
S.
Binger
farmed
Alley Lot 36 Lot 30
& Lot 31
Back
Half
Lot 30
Abraham
Jane
Cummings
Merchants


________
Lot 31







R
E
Lot 29
Daniel
White
Shoe
Shop
________
Lot 32
James
Westlake
Tailor
Fur
Shoe-
maker
Lot 29
Lot 32
Con’t.
Lot 28 Alley Lot 27 Lot 26 Lot 25
Paint
Shop
Lot 42
S.
Binger
farmed
Lot 39
Binger
farmed
Lot 38
Binger
farmed
AlleyLot 35 Lot 34
Back
Half
Lot 34
Store
E
T
Lot 32
Lot 32
Cont.
Lot 28
Cont.
Alley Lot 27 Lot 26 Lot 25
Alley
Lot 43
Binger
farmed
Lot 44
Binger
farmed
Lot 45
Binger
farmed
Alley Lot 46 Lot 47
Lot 48
Back
half
Lot 47
S.
Campbell


________
Lot 48
Un-
developed



Lot 50
Nancy
Forest
seam-
stress
________
Lot 49
Mrs.
Cochran
Dwelling
1
Andrew
Ault
Dwelling
2
Car-
penter
Joiner
Lot 50
Lot 49
back
half
Lot 51
Binger
farmed
AlleyLot 52Lot 53 Lot 54
Lot 80
Binger
farmed
Lot 79
Binger
farmed
Lot 78
Binger
farmed
Alley Lot 77
School
* see
info.
below
Lot 76
back
half
Lot 76
Richard
Hick-
erson
Teacher

Lot 75
Samuel
Binger
Teamster
Farm
Lab.
Lot 75
back
half
Lot 74
Binger
farmed
Alley Lot 73 Lot 72 Lot 71
Alley
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
AlleyLot 114 Lot 113
back
half
Lot 113
Car-
penter

Lot 112 Lot 112
back
half
Lot 111AlleyR. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
Alley Lot 115 Lot 116
back
half
Lot 116
George
Kanavel
Boot
Maker

Lot 109
Thomas
Kanavel
Car-
penter
Lot 109
back
half
Lot 110Alley R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
AlleyLot 118 Lot 117
back
half
Lot 117
M.
Shackley

Lot 108
David
Lawson
Weaver
Blue
White
Coverlets
Lot 108
back
half
Lot 107AlleyR. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
R. H.
Cochran
*Earlier Land Owners


More Information on West Carlisle and surrounding area

Early Land Patents - Pike and Perry Townships
Early land owners arranged by year

Days Gone By - Scrapbook
Photographs shared by the Gault family of West Carlisle

Return to Coshocton - Pike and Perry Resource Page